Q&A with Cambridge-based interior designer Juliet Coleman

If you repeat a formula, you’re no longer creating.

That’s my golden rule for decorating and designing, as well as imbuing a home with warmth and soul.

 

I’m all for individuality, rather than trends.

I’m more interested in looking at each client’s needs, as we’re all so different with what we want in our homes and how they should feel. 

 

Personalising rooms and adding splashes of strong colour helps bring character to a space

Initial design is the place to spend the most money. 

Layout is a lot easier to change on paper than when it’s up and built.

 

Don’t go too big.

We have this tendency to build huge houses we then need to furnish and decorate – which costs.

 

Forest green, terracotta and the odd startling blue are happening colours.

Also big in interiors are soft furnishings and accessories with a tribal or exotic pattern. Expect to see even larger and more impactful applications in carpet, wallpaper and window treatments.

 

I’m a huge fan of clean, unadorned interiors.

They lend themselves perfectly to the use of natural materials such as wood, leather and linen. Molded plastic and plywood furniture is huge at the moment. Likewise, open furniture that is raised off the floor for an airy feeling. And, to enhance that light airy space, walls are predominantly white tones, with bare floors and natural rugs.  

I wouldn’t like to see the return of the avocado bathroom suite.

Yuck. Likewise the fluffy door mat around the loo.

 

 

A coat of paint works wonders.

It’s one of the easiest ways to transform a room. As is rearranging existing furniture and getting rid of stuff you no longer really like or need.

 

Interior designers don’t have to cost a lot.

A consultation for an hour or two can be enough to help re-evaluate an interior with fresh eyes and to provide simple solutions to refresh a room.

 

Always get the best contractors in town.

They’ll save you money in the long run.