MODERN WHARE

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‘Maungārongo’ honours the heritage of its Bay of Plenty surroundings and puts into practice sustainable initiatives. Traditional Māori whare are repositories of whakapapa (genealogy), knowledge and histories. Every element tells a story, from the pou whakairo (carved figures on the walls) to the tukutuku (decorative lattice) panels and kōwhaiwhai (painted rafters). They are places that connect people to people, and people to place. The design of this distinctive 194sqm three-bedroom home is in keeping with this custom, and depicts traditional whare in a contemporary way.

The black stone island in the kitchen draws on the owner’s connection to Tuhua/Mayor Island, where the glassy stone obsidian is found. Rangarua weave is repeated in the tiled splashback, and can also be found in the downstairs powder room and laundry.

A key feature of Maungārongo (peace) is the landscaping, which draws on the environment. The area surrounding the site was a wetland 100 years ago, and a key objective is to restore it. Other green initiatives include use of recycled insulation and locally grown renewable timber, as well as passive solar heating and natural ventilation.

Region:

Bay of Plenty / Central Plateau
CARTERS New Home $1 Million - $1.5 Million